Milton Light Up EACH Life

Light Up EACH Life Buildings

As part of the Light Up EACH Life campaign, we are asking iconic buildings to illuminate in our charity colours of purple and orange. On the 8th of December the following buildings will be lighting up in Cambridge City Centre. Please make sure you go and visit them on the evening and show your support by posting photos using #LightUpEACHLife.


St Andrew's Baptist ChurchSt Andrew's Baptist Church

A group of Christians associated with what is now St Andrew’s Street Baptist Church has met locally since 1689, and worship has taken place on the current site since 1721.  The current church building dates from 1903, with a slightly older church hall, and a church centre added in the 1980s.  Over the years, prominent Baptist pastors have ministered here, including Revd Robert Robinson and Revd Robert Hall, and at times the sanctuary has been packed with as many as 800 people.  Currently St A’s is a congregation of about 120 on Sundays, and the church centre and LivingStones Café welcome hundreds of people for various activities throughout the week, delivering the vision of being open 7 days a week. Our beautiful Bunyan stained glass window commemorates those who gave their lives in World War I; it depicts 3 figures from John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress and 3 aspects of Christian life – Freedom. Truth and Self-Sacrifice. For more info, please pick up one of the yellow history leaflets.

As a church family we are very pleased to be supporting EACH’s incredibly valuable work by hosting what will be an amazing Christmas concert of light and sound


The Grafton Centre
The Grafton

The Grafton is a covered shopping centre in Cambridge on the eastern edge of the main shopping district. The Fitzroy Street entrance recently reopened having undergone a major refurbishment. The entrance now features a striking double height glazed roof with feature lighting installed, which along with a new floor, creates a bright and spacious environment for visitors. Double height shop fronts have been installed to some of the larger stores and new shops have been created at this part of the centre

The Grafton Manager, John O’Shea:
I’m delighted that we’ll be supporting EACH with such a fantastic campaign. It will be great to have the Fitzroy Street entrance of the centre lit up in orange and purple to raise awareness of the extremely important work that the charity does. As a key part of the Cambridge community, it is vital to us that we support groups and organisations such as EACH whenever possible and I’m proud that we’re able to do just that this December. 


The Fitzwilliam MuseumThe Fitzwilliam Museum

The Fitzwilliam Museum was founded in 1816 and is the fine art and antiquities museum of the University of Cambridge.  Located in a prominent position on Trumpington Street, the Museum now houses over half a million artefacts from around the world:  from Egyptian coffins to impressionist masterpieces; illuminated manuscripts to Renaissance Sculpture and from rare coins to Korean ceramics.

We have been working with EACH Milton since 2013.  Initially funded for three years as part of the Start Hospices programme run by Children and the Arts, we developed ways of working together to ensure that the Museum and its collections were made accessible to the children with life-limiting conditions and their families.  In that time we piloted a range of events which has included special EACH Families openings of the Museum, sibling workshops, Christmas decoration making and coffee mornings for bereaved families and opportunities for the Hospice Art Therapist to work with children from EACH in the Museum.  Our working relationship is now so strong we are able to offer a year round programme for EACH families, often alongside our core families’ programme, which is sustainable beyond the original funding.

Rachel Sinfield from The Fitzwilliam Museum:We feel very privileged to work with the children and families connected with EACH Milton, which is something we do quietly throughout the year.  By illuminating the portico of The Fitzwilliam Museum as part of the Light Up EACH Life campaign it gives us the opportunity to show publicly how much we support the work of EACH and value the life of every child they care for.

 

mathematical bridgeThe Mathematical Bridge

Queens College’s Mathematical bridge was designed in 1748 by William Etheridge, and was built in 1749 by James Essex the Younger. It has subsequently been repaired in 1866 and rebuilt to the same design in 1905. The red-brick building seen on the right of the photograph is the riverside building (ca. 1460), the oldest building on the river at Cambridge, containing parts of the President’s Lodge.

The bridge will be lit on the 8th of December in purple and orange, to honour Light Up EACH Life.





The Round ChurchThe Round Church
The Round Church, one of only four in the country, was built in the early 12th century as a wayfarers' chapel. It belongs to the parish of St. Andrew the Great and is home to the Round Church Visitor Centre which offers modern wayfarers the chance to explore Cambridge's rich Christian Heritage through engaging exhibitions and guided walks.



The Corpus Clock

The Corpus Clock is one of the most distinctive public monuments in Cambridge, an unusual device for the measurement of time being both hypnotically beautiful and deeply disturbing. It was invented, designed and given to Corpus Christi College by Dr John C Taylor OBE FREng  (m1959), who worked with local engineering company Huxley Bertram  in constructing the Clock.

The Corpus Clock

The radiating ripples of the clock face allude to the Big Bang, the central impact that formed the universe and could be considered as the beginning of time. Sitting atop the clock is an extraordinary monster: the ‘Chronophage’, meaning ‘time-eater’, for that is what the Chronophage does, devouring each minute as it passes with a snap of its jaws. 

The Corpus Clock has no hands or digital numbers, but instead 3 rings of LEDs, which reading from the innermost ring show hours, minutes and seconds. When an hour is struck there is no chiming of bells, but rather the shaking of chains and a hammer hitting a wooden coffin. Time passes and we all die, a fact further represented by the Latin inscription underneath the clock, mundus transit et concupiscentia eius, meaning 'the world and its desires pass away'.

A further Latin inscription adorns the pendulum: Joh. Sartor Monan Inv. MMVIII, which translates as follows: Joh. is Johannes, Sartor is the mediaeval Latin for tailor, Monanensis is the Isle of Man, Inv. is invenit, a verb with multiple meanings, e.g. discovered/made/brought to fruition, and lastly MMVIII is the year 2008. Thus, John Taylor, of the Isle of Man, made it, in 2008.

Dr Ewan St. John Smith, Senior Lecturer in Pharmacology, Fellow of Corpus and Custodian of the Corpus Chronophage Clock:
EACH does fantastic work in the local community to provide support to both children and their families, and Corpus is delighted to be part of the Light Up EACH Life campaign to help raise awareness for the brilliant work that they do.

Other buildings being ​illuminations:

  • The Guildhall

  • I can’t imagine what it would have been like. Nobody should have to, every family should be offered the support we were, and are still getting Claire, Jacob’s mum
  • EACH helps us to create lovely memories and has played an important part in all of our lives, not just Lucy’s. Heather, Lucy’s mum
  • It’s been a great opportunity to meet other parents in a similar situation, something that doesn't really happen anywhere else. Helen, William’s mum
  • EACH supports families when they’re at their absolute lowest, helping them to come to terms with their child’s illness, losing them and beyond Brad, Stanley's Dad
  • When we first heard about the hospice we were apprehensive because we didn’t know what to expect. When we got there we realised it was a lovely place where Renee would be well looked after, and we would be able to have a much-needed break. Stacy, Renee’s mum
  • We arrived at the hospice feeling scared and alone. We had so many questions – they answered them all and more. Claire, Jacob’s mum
  • Renee loves going to The Treehouse, but it’s great that care staff are also able to visit us at home too. Stacy, Renee’s mum
  • I didn’t realise hope was a gift until I became a mum. My little boy taught me many things and that was one of them Claire, Jacob’s mum
  • The play specialists are excellent and I also get inspiration from the activities they organise. Heather, Lucy’s mum
  • EACH helped us with coping mechanisms and special ways of remembering Stanley. Brad, Stanley's Dad
  • Children like Lucy don’t get the opportunity to go to sleepovers or to their friends for tea, so the interaction she has at the hospice is priceless. Heather, Lucy’s mum
  • We are also supported by the 24/7 True Colours nurses and it’s so reassuring knowing we can call on them whenever we need support or advice Helen, William’s mum
  • I really love going to the hospice. I’ve made friends there and get to do loads of fun stuff. Renee
  • EACH has helped us keep Stanley’s memory alive. And allows us to look to the future Brad, Stanley's Dad

The Treehouse

St. Augustine’s Gardens,
Ipswich, IP3 8NS

Milton

Church Lane, Milton,
Cambridge, CB24 6AB

Quidenham

Quidenham , Norwich,
Norfolk, NR16 2PH